Christine Whelan, PH.D.

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Moderator, April 17th Evening Panel: 
What the New Science of Psychedelics Means for Mental Health,
Featuring Dr. Andrew Weil, Dr. Charles Raison, and Michael Pollan


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Dr. Christine Whelan is a professor, author, keynote speaker and nationally recognized through leader on the quest for happiness and well-being. In her research and teaching she lives out Seneca’s hope that it is “not for school but for life we learn.” Dr. Whelan’s interest in psychedelics and transformative plant medicines grew out of her life-long mission to translate and instrumentalize cutting-edge academic research to positively impact the lives of as many people as possible. Indeed, she brings to this panel a lifetime of experience: Dr. Whelan has been moderating scientific discussions on health and well-being since the age 8, when she hosted a nationally syndicated radio show called No Kidding, helping prominent physicians and scientists to translate their research into kid-speak. (Yes, you may tease her about this fact when you meet her.) 

As a clinical professor in the School of Human Ecology at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, Dr. Whelan teaches popular classes on the intersection of money and happiness. She’s the director of MORE, the Money, Relationships and Equality Initiative, which advocates for financial education and equality throughout the life course. She is the best-selling author of four books, including The Big Picture: A Guide to Finding Your Purpose in Life (Templeton Press, 2016). 

As a keynote speaker, she has taken the stage on topics of purpose, leadership, financial well-being and self-improvement. She is a nationally recognized thought leader, helping groups like Kaiser Permanente, Linkage, AARP’s Life Reimagined, Jackson National, Hackensack-Meridian Health and others on purpose-focused approaches to health, finances and self-improvement strategies for life’s transitions. 

As a media voice, Dr. Whelan has been published in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post and The New York Times, among other national outlets. She has a monthly live local television segment on well-being, and has appeared live on national TV and radio numerous times. 


 
 
 
Keith LaBaw